On This Date in SCOTUS History – June 13

photo by Jennifer Enberg

‚ÄčIn 1966, the landmark case of Miranda v. State of Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966), was decided.  The 5-4 majority held that a person in custody must be informed of his right to counsel before and during questioning, and the right to not self-incriminate.  It further held that the suspect must not only understand these rights but, should the suspect choose to waive these rights, that it be done voluntarily.  While most are familiar with the case of Miranda v. Arizona, which gave rise to the term “Miranda rights,” did you know that three additional cases fell under this SCOTUS ruling?  Westover v. United States, Vignera v. New York, and California v. Stewart, had been consolidated with Miranda.


In 1967, Thurgood Marshall was nominated to the Court by President Johnson. He was confirmed on August 30, 1967, by a vote of 69-11, becoming the first African American to serve as an Associate Justice.  Justice Marshall, himself, won 29 out of the 32 cases he argued before the Supreme Court, the most famous being Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).